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COVID-19 antibody testing in Schuylkill County – PAhomepage

Cornerstone RHC is now offering COVID-19 antibody testing, as featured on PAhomepage.com.

This test will help patients determine if they have the COVID-19 antibodies present in their blood. This test helps patients determine if they already had COVID-19 and did not know it. It will also help the government understand how pervasive the novel virus is in the community.

To schedule a COVID-19 antibody test, please follow the instructions here.

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WNEP News: Drive-thru medical care in Frackville

Story by WNEP News
Author: Chase Senior
Published: 4:58 PM EDT March 25, 2020
Updated: 4:58 PM EDT March 25, 2020

FRACKVILLE, Pa. — The waiting room is empty at Cornerstone Coordinated Health Care in Frackville, but the parking lot is getting a lot of traction.

“How can we see patients and keep them safe and out of the waiting room to limit exposure?” asked medical director Dr. James Greenfield. “One of the things we came up with is drive-thru medicine.”

Due to the coronavirus outbreak, Cornerstone is trying to limit almost all foot traffic and the spreading of germs inside the clinic. So if you feel ill and want to be seen, you don’t even have to get out of your car. A doctor or nurse will come to your car.

Signs on the door state that if you show any symptoms associated with COVID-19, you must return to your vehicle.

“Our medical assistant will come out and check vital signs. Then me, or one of the other providers, will come out and do an evaluation and decide what needs to be done,” said Dr. Greenfield.

The process to be seen is pretty easy. You’ll have to give the office a call to set up an appointment. Then, when you get here, you’ll park, and somebody will be out to see you.

“It is a crazy time. People are scared. They’re not sure what’s going on, but we’re going to be here. Health care, we need to be on the front line at this point, and this is why we signed up and why we’re here,” Dr. Greenfield added. “We’re not going anywhere. We’re keeping our doors open, and we’re going to do the best we can.”

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Important info about COVID-19

The COVID-19 virus (Coronavirus), has created a temporary need for some changes in healthcare and the way outpatient offices evaluate and treat patients.  We will not close and we will continue to see our patients or anyone who needs outpatient medical care.

To accommodate out patients in the safest way possible to keep possible COVID-19 exposure to minimal risk we are adding two new services as of 3/23/20. The first is Telemedicine. The second is Drive Up Medicine.

COVID-19 has created a short term change to the way we live. To decrease the risk of spread or contracting COVID-19 the most effective thing you can do to stay healthy is routinely wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds. Keep your 6 foot spacing when in public as much as possible to protect you and your loved ones.

If you feel unwell, if you think you have COVID-19 or if you may have been exposed to someone who does, stay home, rest and drink plenty of clear fluids. Keep track of your symptoms. If they persist or worsen call our office.

For more information about COVID-19, please see the CDC’s website which is updated daily.

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Ways to stay warm and safe while working in the cold

ORWIGSBURG, SCHUYLKILL COUNTY (WBRE/WYOU) — As temperatures dip into the low 20s and teens, you know its time to bundle up.  Most of us are just outside going to and from, but what about those people who spend all day outside working?

When it’s this cold we need to take it seriously.  There are many dangers that come along with being outside when the temperature drops, especially when there’s a windchill.

“It’s a cold day,” said Thomas Rogal, Schuylkill County Maintenance Manager.

Just because it’s cold, doesn’t mean there aren’t roads to fix. PennDOT workers layer up before they clock in at 7 a.m. for another 8-hour day in the cold.

“The hard, windy days are by far the worst, it sucks the heat right out of you,” said Rogal.

They wear helmet liners, thick gloves and socks, boots, and of course layer up their coats.

“The key to stay warm in these conditions is to stay active,” said Rogals.

To prevent serious problems, they have safety talks twice a day.

“This is very deadly when its this cold,” said Dr. James Greenfield, local physician and ER doctor.

Doctors say the big things to watch out for:  frostbite — when your skin appears white, waxy and hard to the touch… Which can result in amputation.

“Frost bite can even happen faster than 20 minutes depending how cold it is,” said Greenfield.

Hypothermia  — when your body temperature drops into the low 90s or the 80s… Which can alter organ function.

“When you start to become hypothermic sometimes you don’t even notice it at times,” said Greenfield.

Signs include uncontrolled shivering, slurred speech, and confused behavior.  If you realize you are indeed too cold, experts say it’s best to warm up gradually.

Also, if you have asthma, doctors recommend keeping an inhaler with you during the winter months.  The cold air is dryer, and could affect your lungs. Another thing to keep in mind, your energy levels.

“You can get dehydrated quite easily if you’re not paying attention because you actually use a lot of energy to keep your body warm,” said Greenfield.

Experts recommend drinking warm, sweet beverages and eating high-calorie foods such as hot pastas to produce more energy that your body can use to keep you warm.

Experts also say it’s important to remember to wear a hat! The majority of heat leaves from your head and other extremities like your nose and ears, so it’s a good idea to cover those up, too.

Workers who take certain medications, or suffer from diseases like diabetes or hypertension, are at an increased risk when out in the cold.  If anyone experiences signs of frostbite or hypothermia, they should call for help.

Originally Published at PAHomepage here
By: Haley Bianco
Date: Dec 27, 2017 06:16 PM EST

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Doctor from Cornerstone RHC returns from Everest to help kids

FRACKVILLE, SCHUYLKILL COUNTY (WBRE/WYOU) — A local doctor returns home after climbing the tallest mountain in the world — for a cause. Dr. James Greenfield put down the stethoscope and picked up his hiking gear to take on Mount Everest.

“We can do a lot more than we think if we put our mind to it,” said Greenfield.

He mastered the 10-day hike, but he says it wasn’t easy! Saying, if he was doing it for himself, he wouldn’t have signed up! But he was doing it for others, specifically for 150 kids in Kenya.

Greenfield is a volunteer with the nonprofit Care Highway International. As a doctor, he’ll visit the facility in Africa for health checks. But he’ll also go on expeditions like this to raise money for the organization.

“We’re only here for so long, and if we can do things that help someone else in this world, it’s worth it,” said Greenfield.

Because of the time of year, the group could not hike to the peak of the mountain — which is only open for a short period in the spring. Instead, they hiked to base camp — which is still very high up! Everest base camp is about 18-thousand feet above sea level.

Greenfield spent months preparing for the trek, and took his time on the mountain, adjusting to the high altitudes, and taking it all in.

“Knowing that we’re helping these kids out. That’s what really made it worth it,” he said.

Now that he’s back home, it’s time to get back to work as a doctor in Schuylkill and Carbon counties, but he says as he does, he’ll keep spreading awareness about the organization.

And he’s already planning his next adventure! He plans to visit the kids in Kenya in the spring of 2019.

“There’s always something we can do,” said Greenfield.

For more information on the nonprofit group click here.

Originally Published at PAHomepage here
By: Haley Bianco
Date: Dec 02, 2017 07:00 PM EST